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2 edition of Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite found in the catalog.

Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite

K. O. Bennington

Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite

by K. O. Bennington

  • 21 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Riebeckite.,
  • Asbestos -- Thermodynamics.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 28-30.

    Statementby K. O. Bennington, M. J. Ferrante, and J. M. Stuve.
    SeriesReport of investigations - Bureau of Mines ; 8265, Report of investigations (United States. Bureau of Mines) -- 8265.
    ContributionsFerrante, M. J. 1930-, Stuve, J. M., United States. Bureau of Mines.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2], ii, 30 p. :
    Number of Pages30
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17647137M

    Asbestos is the general term for a group of naturally occurring, fibrous silicate minerals. The most abundant form is chrysotile, which is found in bundles of fibres that can exceed 10 cm in length. Chrysotile is the only serpentine variety. The five amphibole varieties include amosite, crocidolite, actinolite, tremolite, and anthophyllite. dilute acid) of some asbestos minerals; data in Table 2 shows optical characteristics and relative flexibility between asbestos minerals. Chrysotile Mc:J3Si20S (OH) 4 Chrysotile is the fibrous variety and least abundant polymorph of the serpentine minerals. Also known as "white asbestos.

      Asbestos. Asbestos refers to six fibrous silicate minerals found widely throughout the world, and is divided into two categories based on the chemical composition and crystalline structure13, a serpentine form (ie, chrysotile) and a thin, rodlike form (ie, amphiboles, including crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite, tremolite, and actinolyte). Crocidolite is the correct name for the amphibole asbestos commonly known as blue asbestos. Its chemical composition is Na 2 Fe 3 2+ Fe 2 3+ Si 8 O 22 (OH) 2 and the presence of sodium instead of iron in the X group and the smaller proportion of iron distinguish it chemically from amosite.

    Amphibole forms of asbestos are often divided into those with considerable commercial exploitation (amosite and crocidolite) and those that are encountered largely as intrusions into other mineral deposits (tremolite, actinolite, anthophyllite); thus, tremolite is found in many chrysotile ore beds, and an amphibole that has been variously. Other amphibole minerals are known to occur as fibers or asbestoform habit (winchite, riechterite, and fluoro-edenite), but these minerals are not specifically listed in the asbestos regulations (Skinner et al., ; Van Gosen, ). FIGURE 1. Asbestos minerals occurrences in mining districts in New Mexico. (See Appendix 1 for details.


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Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite by K. O. Bennington Download PDF EPUB FB2

Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite. [Washington]: Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, (OCoLC) Online version: Bennington, K.O.

Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite. [Washington]: Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, (OCoLC)   Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite [Bennington, K. O.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidoliteAuthor: K.

Bennington. Thermodynamic Data on the Amphibole Asbestos Minerals Amosite and Crocidolite. Thermodynamic properties of two amphibole asbestos minerals were determined by the Bureau of Mines.

enthalpies above k were determined with a copper-block drop calorimeter to k for amosite and to k for crocidolite. Thermodynamic data determined. The amphibole asbestos family includes five minerals: actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite (a fibrous variety of riebeckite), and amosite (a fibrous variety of grunerite).

With respect to chrysotile, amphibole asbestos fibres are more brittle and usually exhibit a straighter, more needle-like crystal habit (Fig. (b)). Data Providers; Services; Blog; About; Contact us; Search.

Location of Repository Thermodynamic data on the amphibole asbestos minerals amosite and crocidolite / By K. Bennington, joint author.

Stuve and joint author. Michael J. Ferrante. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. ).Mode of access: Internet Topics: Asbestos. Amphibole (/ ˈ æ m f ɪ b oʊ l /) is a group of inosilicate minerals, forming prism or needlelike crystals, composed of double chain SiO 4 tetrahedra, linked at the vertices and generally containing ions of iron and/or magnesium in their structures.

Amphiboles can be green, black, colorless, white, yellow, blue, or brown. The International Mineralogical Association currently classifies. Although the production and use of the commercial amphibole asbestos minerals-grunerite (amosite) and riebeckite (crocidolite)-have been almost completely eliminated from world commerce, special.

Crocidolite asbestos. Crocidolite (also known as blue asbestos) is common in some spray-on coatings, pipe insulation, plastics and cement products. It is probably the most dangerous of the asbestos types. The asbestos fibers are very thin, allowing them to lodge in the lungs more easily.

Crocidolite is one of the amphibole asbestos minerals. Asbestos (pronounced: / æ s ˈ b ɛ s t ə s / or / æ s ˈ b ɛ s t ɒ s /) is a term used to refer to six naturally occurring silicate are composed of long and thin fibrous crystals, each fibre being composed of many microscopic 'fibrils' that can be released into the atmosphere by abrasion and other processes.

Asbestos is an excellent electrical insulator and is highly heat. Amphiboles are hydrated mineral silicates five of which occur in asbestiform habits as asbestos grunerite (amosite) asbestos, riebeckite (crocidolite) asbestos, anthophyllite asbestos, tremolite. Asbestos is a generic name given to six fibrous minerals that have been used in commercial products.

The six types of asbestos are chrysotile, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite asbestos, tremolite asbestos, and actinolite asbestos. Several properties that make asbestos so versatile and cost effective are high tensile strength, chemical and thermal stability, high.

Amphibole asbestos includes the minerals actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, and amosite. Amphibole asbestos has straight, needle-like fibers that are more brittle than those of serpentine asbestos and are more limited in their ability to be fabricated (1, 2). There are 6 main types of asbestos that are known as chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite (the 3 that are most often used) and anthophyllite, tremolite and actinolite.

Asbestos is the collective name given to all 6 of these mineral types. These asbestos minerals can actually be divided into two different types, which are serpentine and amphibole. Amphibole asbestos, crocidolite (riebeckite) and amosite (grunerite) can be abundant in Precambrian iron-formations.

The phase relations involving these amphiboles are evaluated in the system Na-Fe-Mg-Si-O-H on the basis of reported mineral assemblages from various rock types and available thermodynamic data. Mineral Commodity Profiles—Asbestos By Robert L.

Virta Hodgson,p. Chrysotile has been the most com-monly used form of asbestos, followed by crocidolite, amosite, and then anthophyllite asbestos.

Relatively small amounts of tremolite asbestos and actinolite asbestos. It should also be noted that the reef denoted by B is composed of crocidolite at Mafefe and of amosite at Penge. In the asbestos fields a single band of asbestos fibre (normally –30 cm thick) is referred to as a seam and a group of seams (commonly 1–3 m thick) as a reef (Cilliers, ).

Mineral Abundances and Assemblages. As fibrous silicates, asbestos minerals are broadly classified into the serpentine (chrysotile) and amphibole (crocidolite, amosite, tremolite, anthophyllite, actinolite) series, both of which may also contain allied but nonfibrous forms of similar or even identical.

The amphibole minerals amosite and crocidolite were subjected to calcination and to hydrothermal treatment in order to study the effect of these heat treatments on the ability of the minerals to trigger formation of free radicals, which is known to be a main factor causing asbestosis and other asbestos-induced diseases.

Description. A common name given to any of several fibrous magnesium silicate minerals. The most widely used asbestos mineral is a type of serpentine called chrysotile (white asbestos). Other asbestos minerals are: riebeckite, crocidolite (blue asbestos), amianthus, anthophyllite, amphibole, amosite (brown asbestos), tremolite, or actinolite.

Asbestos is. Asbestos fibers were used in some acoustic asbestos ceiling tiles, often amphibole asbestos such as amosite, crocidolite, anthrophylite, tremolite, and actinolite, with amosite among the most commonly-found.

Modern ceiling products do not contain asbestos. See ASBESTOS CEILING TILES. Insulating panels. See ASBESTOS INSULATION. Asbestos fibers in acoustic asbestos ceiling tiles and fire-resistant ceilings, often amphibole asbestos such as amosite, crocidolite, anthrophylite, teremolite, and actinolite, with amosite among the most commonly-found.

- see CEILING TILES ASBESTOS CONTENT where we include photos of soft Tremolite asbestos ceiling panels.Asbestos Defined Asbestos is a collective term for different fibrous materials in the surroundings namely amosite, chrysotile, crocidolite and the fibrous varieties of tremolite, antinolite and anthophyllite which belong to the mineral family referred to as amphibole with the exception of chrysotile which belongs to the serpentine minerals.The term “asbestos” is a misleading non-scientific commercial term [], which commonly refers to silicate minerals with fibrous morphology [].From a legal perspective, six fibrous minerals are regulated as asbestos minerals: five species of the amphibole group, and chrysotile, which belongs to the serpentine group of the layer silicates [3,4,5].